Delegates to the American Library Association take a tour of Labor and the California African-American Freedom Trail led by John William Templeton.   His three columns in April and  May in The Hill  after participating the Urban Librarians Unite conference helped sway Congressional sentiment towards the eventual restoration of funding for the Institute for Museum and Library Science.  His newest book Our10Plan: State of Black Business was featured during the Hampton Ministers Conference to 10,000 ministers and musicians.   LASoul Shuttle offers daily service in Los Angeles to meet the million black Angelenos. Practice 31 Ways 31 Days by shopping for great books, events and tours on californiablackhistory.com.  For the 25th anniversary of Our Roots Run Deep: the Black Experience in California, Vols. 1-4, the 6,000 site California African-American Freedom Trail was presented to the American Historical Association Aug. 5.  Be part of the documentation by joining our quarterly mapping expeditions in October, December, February and May .  Visits to five casinos are part of the excursion.  Who said history isn't fun?

African Free Schools-200 years of impact Summer Institute, July 5-7, 2017 15th Street Presbyterian Church, 1701 R Street, Washington, D.C.  10 a.m. to 3 p.m.                  Visit the African-American Civil War Memorial, Carter G. Woodson Monument and Thurgood Marshall Center during Institute walks. Speakers include Rev. William H. Lamar IV, pastor of Metropolitan A.M.E. Church.

 

Visit Founding Father Alexander Hamilton's estate while attending the New York presentation of African Free Schools-200 years of impact-Summer Institute. Lunch from Harlem's legendary restaurants.  Take the pre-institute tour to the African Burial Grounds and Grant's Tomb on July 11 with the People's Pastor, Rev. Herbert Daughtry, National Presiding Minister of the House of the Lord Churches.

African Free Schools - 200 Years of Impact Summer Institute Philadelphia July 19-21 See Mother Bethel A.M.E., Richard Allen sites,  the first African-American Congress, the Quakers and abolition movement, African-American Museum and Ben Franklin's role in the abolition movement.

 

From 1504 to 1865, the most important issue in the Western Hemisphere was slavery.   Every important decision and event was measured by its impact on slavery. However, American history has been dominated by advocates of the losing side in the battle for human dignity.

There is the impression that the 30 million Africans involved as captives or victims of the slave trade had no opinion about it; did nothing to change it and were passive bystanders for its demise.

Nothing could be further from the truth.   We know that because the strong literary tradition of West Africa, as embodied by the hundreds of thousands of manuscripts still extant in Timbuktu, Gao and Djenne, Mali, sprang forth as soon as Africans could gain access to writing instruments.   "The sacred texts of black history", written in the 19th century under contemporaneous circumstances, are the foundation for Road to Ratification: How 27 States Tackled the Most Pressing Issue in American History, the companion book to the ReUNION: Education-Arts-Heritage instructional series.

R2R answers the most basic questions about black history, with the ratification documents approved by each state between Jan. 31 and Dec. 6, 1865 as the launching point for a backward view of the involvement of Africans in each state's history.   It is designed to provide the long-needed cultural competence to social studies programs at every level of education and a sense of belonging for learners of African descent.

Among the revelations:

The three largest American cities all had African founders.

With the exception of Mississippi, Florida and Texas, the former Confederate states ratified the 13th Amendment before Dec. 6 with the last four states -- South Carolina, Alabama, North Carolina and Georgia--reaching the needed 27 states during a three-week period in November and December 1865

Contrary to the perception that whites all favored slavery, the decisions to support the 13th Amendment were taken by white voters and white legislators, responding to the advocacy of Africans who did not have the right to vote.



 
 
 









article in the Star of Zion about Road to Ratification